Brenda Hopkins Music – Press Releases

Album Review by: Eric Harabadian for Jazz Inside Magazine, June 2012

For this Puerto Rican pianist and composer her instrument serves as a travelogue of sorts. The Keyboard is a vehicle upon which Miranda transports the listener through various moods and states of consciousness. Listening to Brenda Hopkins Miranda’s music is a true spiritually uplifting experience and Works on a number of different levels. She explores the full range of the acoustic piano and runs the gamut from light and unobtrusive trills to cascading crescendos. The leader often employs a liberal use of space and ambience to allow the audience a chance to fully absorb her delicate phrasing and thoughtful sonic dalliances.

“El Camino/The Road” one of the album’s many solo piano pieces that utilizes stark dynamics and builds themes base don arpeggiated figures. She seems to have a strong classical background and this piece surely shows her romantic side. On “hablando con la lluvia/Talking With the Rain” Miranda explores a plethora of emotional terrain. One minute she is subtle and demure and the next takes her to far reaching registers and incredible heights. The drums and bass come in after her extensive intro and further add density to the composition. “Esperando/Waiting” is a beautiful waltz-like figure underscored by hauntingly sublime cello. Eventually, harmonic development, dense with interplay, ensues between Miranda’s brilliant arpeggios and Silva’s dark cello tones. On “Calle Molinos” Miranda’s band plays more like a chamber ensemble, contributing to accents and various intrepid passages. This piece contains several variations of intensity, coloration and mood. “El Espejo en tu mar/The Mirror Inside Your Sea” has a new age kind of quality to it. It begins rooted in an asymmetrical time signature and morphs into a polyrhythmic fantasy. “La Ruta interior/The Inner Path” is an interesting duet between Miranda and percussionist Chavez. She plays a samba inspired piece, with a Bill Evans-like lyricism backed by water-based sound effects. The result is soothing and restorative. Miranda also includes a few more melodic and pop-oriented themes and resolves the disc with a full ensemble number.

“Simple” in some ways is the perfect title for this album in the sense that Miranda’s pianistic approach is soft, unfettered and somewhat easy to grasp. But, on the other hand, her compositions can be unpredictable, uncommonly passionate and quite sophisticated. But the best things that can be said about her music is that it has the power to transform the listener and one can surely be the better person for experiencing it!

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Article by: James Nadal | Published on All About Jazz | May 4, 2012

The piano thoroughly lends itself to the emotional manifestations of the consummate and contemplative Brenda Hopkins Miranda. Simple channels her profound individuality, drawn from a private source of focused consciousness and performed with genuine grace and elegance.

As a composer and producer, Hopkins Miranda is well-honed, and she is attuned to the album concept, as luminously displayed on Recuerdos de Granada/Memoirs from Granada (Zona Boricua, 2009) and its repertoire, drawn from her Spanish sojourn. This time around, she is on a personal spiritual quest and has opted for the uncomplicated structure suggested by the title. But living on a tropical island (Puerto Rico, in the pianist’s case) creates its own sense of awareness, one which, here, enhances an integral component of Hopkins Miranda’s music. From the opening “Sand Balcony,” Hopkins takes a pianistic stroll from the beach to “The Road,” which captures an approaching shower, leading to the downpour on “Talking with the Rain,” slows down “When Darkness Arrives,” and comes full circle with “Waiting,” where the spirit of Pablo Casals, portrayed by cellist Kutasha Silva, drifts amongst the clouds. “Calle Molinos” (Miranda’s former address in Granada) displays glimpses of the vibrant flamenco flavor she knows well and later revisits with a full ensemble on “Jameando por la Calle Molinos.” Her softer side is revealed on “Sahira,” “Ivannah” and “Harito,” which—written for her nieces and nephew—highlight the playful and mischievous traits of children. Hopkins can keep it passive and light, or venture into the technical storm of “The Music Inside Your Sea” with turbulence and tranquility. The sostenuto chords and resolute structure of “Broken Promise” show the complexity of her personality, which she willingly hangs on her musical sleeve. A superb production, Simple portrays Hopkins Miranda as an adventuresome pianist, and embodies the old adage that still waters run deep.

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Concert Review by: James Nadal for All About Jazz

Brenda Hopkins Miranda | Live in Guánica, Puerto Rico | October 23, 2010
Published: November 2, 2010
Brenda Hopkins Miranda @ Bodega Andreu Solé, Guanica, Puerto RicoOctober 23, 2010

The fact that Brenda Hopkins Miranda is one of the most exciting pianists in Puerto Rico certainly added to the allure and excitement in this packed seaside venue. The Bodega Andreu Solé is an open air Spanish winery located on a small bay in Guanica, Puerto Rico. Under the spell of a full moon, this would prove to be the perfect setting to take in Hopkins and her troupe as her music is saturated with both Caribbean and Iberian influences.

Opening the evening’s performance with “Miranda,” and going right into “El Regreso/The Return,” and “Plaza Nueva,” (all from her release Recuerdos de Granada,) there was a resonating flamenco flavor as she set up the ambiance for musical images which progressed as the show continued. She also presented several new tracks from her forthcoming album. The songs “Corozaleando,” and “Cuesta de San Gregorio,” were a special treat to hear for the first time. Hopkins’ compositions are very intense and passionate which are personified by her piano style, for she embodies the music. She is a mesmerizing performer with an absolute command over the production which envelopes her accompanists as well.

The musicians with Hopkins for the evening, bassist Samuel Morales, drummer Vladimir Coronel, and percussionist Guillermo “Memo” Barron, who excels on the djembe and cajon, are her regular band for this “Piano Gitano” tour. They were all in sync with the flow of the music, and also contributed their personal touches at just the right places to liven up the pieces with spontaneity and improvisation.

Just when the audience seemed to grow complacent, the pace quickened with “Vimaambi,” “Flamenco Borincano” (both from the record) and a new composition, “Tangos de Albaicin” which were enhanced by the introduction of a flamenco dancer to dramatize the songs. The young lady, Vali Val, added the perfect visualization for which this music is associated. The two years Hopkins spent in Granada, Spain as pianist for a flamenco dance show is evident in not only her music, but in the choreography with all its authentic flair and sizzle. This proved to be the highlight of the evening as the yells of “Olé” rang out.

After a brief intermission the band returned with “Chawarma,” a strong piano number, where Hopkins stretched out and displayed her amazing jazz chops. This was followed by “Huerto de Juan Rana,” with its extended pensive intro leading into a spiraling crescendo. Having performed most of the songs on her album, which a lot of the audience was familiar with, by the end of the night’s performance Hopkins had proven that she could deliver the goods in a live setting and keep the audience captivated while doing it. The coupling of her tremendous talent with perfect rhythmic accompaniment, which is essential to a Puerto Rican artist playing on home turf, won her an affectionate response and ovation for her efforts.

Though Brenda Hopkins Miranda can easily draw a crowd in the capital city of San Juan, it was quite impressive to see such enthusiasm at this rural location, which proved to be the ideal spot for this performance. I for one had hoped to see her in such an intimate place, as this is not theater, sit in your seat, type of a show. And most everyone present had a reasonable knowledge of what the music was about and what to expect. We were not disappointed.

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Jazz Review / Album Review by: James Nadal

Published: December 14, 2009
Recuerdos de Granada / Memoirs of Granada
Brenda Hopkins Miranda | Zona Boricua Records (2009)

Pianist Brenda Hopkins Miranda did not go to Spain to record an album. She went to study ethnomusicology in the city of Granada, and in the ensuing two years was drawn into the tablao or flamenco dance culture of the city. From listening to the opening flairs of Recuerdos de Granada/Memoirs of Granada it would be a logical assumption that the music chose her. The results of that encounter are heard in this recording.

The music on the record is exceptionally visual and its concept is intrinsically associated with the expression of dance. Hopkins, in her role of pianist, was invited to join a local dance troupe in Granada. Here she learned and absorbed the fluid rules of the flamenco structure with its compas, or tendency to vary the timing according to the passage of the song/dance. Yet the record is bursting with jazz, danza, and tango runs as well as her Afro-Cuban influences which weave throughout. The songs performed on the record were all composed and produced by Hopkins, who knew exactly what she wanted to convey and set out to accomplish her intentions.

Hopkins is accompanied by such rhythmically sensitive musicians as bassists Samuel Morales and Aldemar Valentin, with drummers Hector Matos, Efrain Martinez, and percussionist Enrique “El Peru” Chavez. She offers the music with the right amount of authenticity and innovation to define the city of Granada which she wants us to experience.
From the opening song of “Miranda,” and on through such tablao-influenced numbers as “Plaza Nueva,” “El Regreso/The Return,” “Vimaambi” and “Flamenco Borincano” (a tribute to Puerto Rico) the music is showcased in its full Spanish regalia, down to her imitating the rasgueado or strumming of the guitar. She has a distinctive percussive approach in her repertoire which allows her to execute these pieces with authority. Her years of performing experience on the Latin American music scene honed her skills in dealing with intricate rhythms and complex arrangements, and she employs them all with great tact and precision.

The music is not one-dimensional, though the idea is obviously a nod to her Spanish episode. There are jazz-flavored numbers which are tastefully performed with plenty of time for the players to stretch and allow the music to determine its own course. “Mi Sacromonte,” with muted trumpet by Carlos Sanchez, is a fine example. The band also kicks into a higher gear with the frenetic carnival tempo of “Confeti.”

Hopkins, being a brilliant pianist, displays her technical virtuosity in a variety of settings and tempos as with the songs “Alas de Ilusion,/Wings of Illusion” “Chawarma,” “Huerto de Juan Rama,” and “El Darro.” She expresses her emotions of departing Spain in “Ausencia/Absence,” a nostalgic lamentation which closes the chapter on her Recuerdos of Granada/Memoirs of Granada.

This record maintained its center of focus throughout and certainly portrays Hopkins’ musical sojourn in Granada. The songs are all interconnected by the concept she established, and the music dances on its own.

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Jazz and Bossa Blog Talk Radio Album Review by: Wilbert Sostre

Featured Artist: Brenda Hopkins Miranda | CD Title: Recuerdos de Granada | Year: 2009 Record Label: Independent | Style: Folk Jazz | Musicians: Brenda Hopkins Miranda (piano, palmas), Samuel Morales (bass), Aldemar Valentin (bass), Hector Matos (drums), Efrain Martinez (drums), Enrique Chavez (percussion, palmas), Carlos Sanchez (trumpet), Jeanne d’Arc S. Casas Panouze (dancing steps)

Review: Every once in a while one comes across a CD of such quality and beauty that restore your faith in music. Brenda Hopkins Miranda’s Memoirs from Granada is that kind of CD. A music jewel from beginning to end, in Memoirs from Granada, Brenda captivates the listener with an exquisite fusion of Jazz, music from Spain and of course, music from her country, Puerto Rico.

Brenda Hopkins is a wonderful pianist, with extraordinary technique, equally impressive playing either Jazz, Rock, or Classical music. With Memoirs from Granada, Brenda adds to that mix, the musical experiences she had while living in Granada, Spain.

Memoirs of Granada starts with a beautiful piano intro on the first track, Miranda, a composition full of melodies played with passion and intensity. Brenda brilliantly used melodic ostinatos to state a theme and create different moods. Ostinato is a repeated melodic or rhythmic pattern.

The melodies on “The Return” show the strong Arabic influence in the music from Spain. On her improvisations, Brenda plays masterfully with the melodies, harmonies and rhythms, accompanied once again by the excellent playing of Efrain Martinez on drums and Aldemar Valentin on bass.

“Plaza Nueva” starts with a fun intro, kind of dissonant. On this piece the music of Spain fuses with Jazz in a perfect musical marriage. Carlos Sanchez is amazing on trumpet with touches of be bop on his phrasing, and Brenda plays some of her best solos on piano. Hector Matos and Samuel Morales play drums and bass on this one.

Carlos Sanchez trumpet steal the show on “Mi Sacromonte”, with melodies reminiscent of the Cool Jazz era. Carlos powerful solos and high notes are a perfect match for the quiet intensity of Brenda’s music. Brenda always finds a way to capture the senses with magnificent compositions and energetic playing.

In a CD full of musical highlights, “Flamenco Borincano” is probably the brightest one. The title comes from one of the most famous songs from Puerto Rico, Lamento Borincano, wrote by Rafael Hernandez. Brenda creates a perfect fusion of the Flamenco feeling with the melodies of Lamento Borincano. “Flamenco Borincano” is already in my opinion, a Puerto Rico Jazz classic. Excellent solo on percussion by Enrique Chavez.

The beautiful, almost heavenly piano melodies on Vimaambi, change into a more rhythmic piece with the flamenco dancer (bailaora). There are some solo piano tracks like Wings of Illusion and Absence for Brenda to showcase his classical influences and technique. And on “Chawarma” there’s a funky feeling with some Rock influences.

There is an almost nostalgic feeling on the piece “Huerto de Juan Rana”, with melodies that seems to evoke memories from Spain. El Darro contains music that invites you to close your eyes and let music take you away.

“Confeti” is the most festive track on this CD, with a fusion of Puerto Rico folk music in the melodies with latin jazz rhythms.

Tracks: Miranda, El Regreso/The Return, Plaza Nueva, Mi Sacromonte, Flamenco Borincano, Vimaambi, Alas de Ilusión/Wings of Illusion, Chawarma, Huerto de Juan Rana, El Darro, Confeti, Ausencia/Absence

Artist’s Website: http://www.brendahopkinsmusic.com
Reviewed by: Wilbert Sostre

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July, August & September 2010 | Cadence | 151 David Kane

Fortunately, it is much easier to be enthusiastic about (4), an interesting new CD from Puerto Rican pianist, Brenda Hopkins Miranda. I was previously unaware of Ms. Hopkins before this CD but I can say that I am now happy to have made the acquaintance. Unsurprisingly, there is a strong element of Spanish/Flamenco/Latin music on the CD, given the leader’s Latin roots. Although the stylistic elements are, for the most part, familiar, based as they are on tra­ditional forms, Hopkins’ creativity precludes any sense of rehash. “Mi Sacromonte” and “Confeti” are two examples of her ability to compose effective pieces that successfully combine the old ideas with new ones. Mention must also be made of her fine playing. She employs a highly percussive/rhythmic approach and is capable of generating real fire, often through the employment of energy-build­ing, obsessive polyrhythmic hemiola such as her solo on “Miranda” (and elsewhere) demonstrates. She also has surrounded herself with fine musicians and the different rhythm sections deployed on different tracks are uniformly first-rate. All in all, Memoirs from Granada is worth your time and attention. Recommended.

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Fundación Nacional Para la Cultura Popular | January 12, 2010

The Fundación Nacional para la Cultura Popular revealed today its selection of the 20 most outstanding recordings of 2009. For this selection the artist’s performance, musical execution, technical work, presentation, visual montage, creativity, coherence and concept where evaluated. The merchandizing strategic work was also taken into account. 16. Brenda Hopkins Miranda: Recuerdos de GranadaPianist Hopkins Miranda illustrates in this work the enriching stage that she lived in Granada alternating with veteran instrumentalists. With diaphanous and precise execution this young female captivates with the performances of “Flamenco Borincano”, “Mi Sacromonte”, “Plaza Nueva”, “Confetti” and “Vimaambi”. And with each performance she reaffirms her incalculable value as a female presence in the difficult world of jazz.

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El Nuevo Día | December 27, 2009

“Between Puerto Rico and Munich”

Puerto Rican music and musicians, and the German label ECM albums dominate my list of 2009’s best jazz recordings. If in one year there is an average of 3 to 4 jazz albums made in Puerto Rico or by Puerto Ricans, this year there are at least 9. Two of them – ‘Esta plena’, by Miguel Zenón and ‘Recuerdos de Granada’, by Brenda Hopkins – are amongst the best of the year.

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Jazz N’ Bossa | December 19, 2009

Every once in a while one comes across a CD of such quality and beauty that it restores your faith in music. Brenda Hopkins Miranda’s Memoirs from Granada is that kind of CD. A music jewel from beginning to end, in Memoirs from Granada, Brenda captivates the listener with an exquisite fusion of Jazz, music from Spain and of course, music from her country, Puerto Rico. Brenda Hopkins is a wonderful pianist, with extraordinary technique, equally impressive playing either Jazz, Rock, or Classical music. With Memoirs from Granada, Brenda adds to that mix, the musical experiences she had while living in Granada, Spain. […]Brenda always finds a way to capture the senses with magnificent compositions and energetic playing.

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All About Jazz | December 14, 2009

Pianist Brenda Hopkins Miranda did not go to Spain to record an album. She went to study ethnomusicology in the city of Granada, and in the ensuing two years was drawn into the tablao or flamenco dance culture of the city. From listening to the opening flairs of Recuerdos de Granada/Memoirs of Granada it would be a logical assumption that the music chose her. The music on the record is exceptionally visual and its concept is intrinsically associated with the expression of dance. Yet the record is bursting with jazz, danza, and tango runs as well as her Afro-Cuban influences which weave throughout. The songs performed on the record were all composed and produced by Hopkins, who knew exactly what she wanted to convey and set out to accomplish her intentions. She offers the music with the right amount of authenticity and innovation to define the city of Granada which she wants us to experience. She has a distinctive percussive approach in her repertoire which allows her to execute these pieces with authority. Her years of performing experience on the Latin American music scene honed her skills in dealing with intricate rhythms and complex arrangements, and she employs them all with great tact and precision. Hopkins, being a brilliant pianist, displays her technical virtuosity in a variety of settings and tempos […] This record maintained its center of focus throughout and certainly portrays Hopkins’ musical sojourn in Granada. The songs are all interconnected by the concept she established, and the music dances on its own.

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Repeating Islands | November 23, 2009

Pianist Brenda Hopkins Miranda has just produced a new CD entitled Recuerdos de Granada/Memoirs of Granada (2009) to much positive acclaim.

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El Nuevo Día | November 15, 2009

“Olé Boricua”

Proud of her culture, Hopkins feels equally proud of her new album, ‘Recuerdos de Granada/ Memoirs from Granada’, in which she combines jazz, flamenco y and echoes of Latin American musics. This is an album that emerges as fruit of the experiences she lived during her two years studying at the Andalusian city. It flows in a notable natural way, from the flamenco bravado of “Miranda” to the mysterious airs of ‘El Darro’, from the cadences of ‘Mi Sacromonte’, between Cuban and bluesy, to the joyous samba of ‘Confetti’. The piano is the main voice, but the contributions of the other musicians – two different units of drums and bass, a percussionist and, in three tunes a trumpet player – work solidly with this music in that terrain that it occupies between two worlds.

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El Nuevo Día | October 25, 2009

“Flamenco Boricua”

Pianist, educator, composer, arranger and a person linked for a very long time to the country’s cultural life, Brenda Hopkins Miranda is one of our most distinguished jazz musicians. She has just added another page charged with originality and feeling to her luminous curriculum. In fact, there is no other recording that has been done in Puerto Rico similar to ‘Recuerdos de Granada’, which Hopkins has recently released under her own recording label Zona Boricua. Product of her two years in the Andalusian city, where she was completing a PHD in Musicology, it is a collection of her own compositions strongly inspired by flamenco music. But it is flamenco with a Caribbean touch, played by someone who is proud of her Puerto Rican heritage. And even though length is not usually the best way to evaluate an album, the 80 minutes and one second in this one are certainly appreciated. But, once again, it is the quality of the music the thing that has the greatest impact. Without abandoning her style – frequently percussive and intense, and with phrases or melodic patterns that almost hypnotize through their insistence – In the most natural and organic way possible Brenda Hopkins has incorporated to her legacy a great musical tradition. And along the way brings us one of the best jazz recordings that have ever been made in the country.

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Puerto Rico Daily Sun | October 28, 2009

Brenda Hopkins, one of the island’s most widely acclaimed and innovative Latin jazz pianists, arrangers and composers, draws on her life experiences to express herself through her music-making. While studying in the ancient, quaint Andalusian city where the Ibero-Celtic and Moorish cultures converge, the Puerto Rican artist absorbed everything she could along the way, from the city’s rich cultural tradition to its diverse musical styles. The result is her newest album “Recuerdos de Granada/Memoirs from Granada”, which fuses Latin jazz and Middle Eastern sounds with flamenco. Hopkin’s seductive, and yet at times upbeat production is comprised of 12 originals that alternate between fast-slow tempos and rhythmic plays as well as mood swings.

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Fundación Nacional Para la Cultura Popular | July 17, 2009

“Sensational and fresh Combination of flamenco, jazz and Celtic music”

One of the most fresh and interesting – and also crowded – shows happening at the Concert Hall of the Fundación Nacional para la Cultura Popular, in Old San Juan, was the one entitled “Between Celtic, Jazz and Flamenco”, which the enthusiastic audience that filled this our bohemian corner fully enjoyed on July 10, 2009. […] the brilliant pianist Brenda Hopkins Miranda, whose domain of her instrument got her warm applause. She didn’t even pause to begin with a sweeping composition of her own and, from then on, between songs, narrated her experiences with the people of Granada, Spain while she lived there. “Flamenco Borincano” – her first bulería –, “Vimaambí”, evocating the theatre in which she performed every weekend and other jazzy flamenco tunes all originals, were much applauded. In each one of them she displayed her mastery as a performer. […] The evening culminated with a high approval of the public that filled the main hall of the Fundación.

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El Ideal | August 19, 2007 | Granada

“Brenda Hopkins, enthusiastic and sonorous at the Alexis” Puerto Rican pianist Brenda Hopkins Miranda is in Granada since the beginning of the year because of academic reasons. In very little time she has assembled her own group and started performing. It has been said that she is the best pianist from Puerto Rico. We heard her enthusiastic and very eloquent, directing her band with conviction. They sound credible, honest and danceable.

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La Opinión de Granada | July 30, 2007

The flamenco base is very emphasized in the work they perform and also relies on collaborations like the one on piano from Puerto Rican Brenda Hopkins, a woman “in transit” on the capital, who desires to contribute her personal style to this genuine recital.

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Noctámbulo | April, 2006

Brenda demonstrated all through the night good instrumental technique and her style was characterized by an energetic and eloquent phrasing. She also established good chemistry with her loyal fans.

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Pa’l Músico de Aquí | January, 2006

They were followed by the excellent Puerto Rican pianist Brenda Hopkins and her group, which gave impressive and elegant demonstration of their music.

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El Nuevo Día | January 21, 2006

The CD Nuestra versión is the legacy of producer Brenda Hopkins. It unites groups Cultura Profética, Gomba Jahbari, Circo, Así Somos, Millo Torres, La PVC y Giovanni Hidalgo in one of history’s most original tributes to the composer (Rafael Hernández) from Aguadilla.

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El Nuevo Día | December 31, 2005

Nuestra versión; Rafael Hernández A true jewel conceptualized by Brenda Hopkins.

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El Vocero | July 26, 2004

With the display of virtuosism and harmonic approach that characterizes her, Hopkins started the concert with the jazz classic “Watermelon Man” from Hearbie Hancock. A delicate jazzed version of “Lamento Borincano” followed accompanied by bassist Junior Irizarry and percussionist Raúl “Tatoo” Rodríguez. Brenda ended with a lot of feeling performing “Bésame Mucho”.

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El Nuevo Día | July 25, 2004

Friday night served as an authentic Latin jazz banquet in charge of pianist Brenda Hopkins, who with her anemone fingers seems to tickle the piano so that songs like Watermelon Man, Lamento Borincano and Bésame Mucho unfold with pleasure and unravel in the air to form steps that take you directly to euphoria. Pianist Brenda Hopkins played to the audience’s most profound feelings.

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El Nuevo Día | April 24, 2003

Brenda has been the most consistent jazz female performer in the latest years.

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El Vocero | April 25, 2003

Today everyone that comes to Carolina will enjoy the good music, chemistry, energy and passion that these women have on stage.

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Cadence Magazine | March, 2001

Brenda Hopkins Miranda is a pianist originally from Puerto Rico whose music is a tasty blend of global influences. In addition to being a remarkable composer and arranger, Miranda is also a formidable pianist. This CD (Bohemia) is a superb mix of European romanticism, Spanish passion and Third World heat. Miranda mixes rhythms together with the intensity of a mad scientist and comes up with something quite unlike any other ethnic Jazz mixture out there. This is highly recommended.

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Earth Star | August/September 2000

Puerto Rican pianist and composer Brenda Hopkins-Miranda returns to Ryles Jazz Club on Thursday, to perform a combination of traditional songs and original compositions inspired by her Caribbean roots. A group of Afro-Caribbean percussionists and other Latin musicians will join Hopkins for a night of exotic sounds and rhythms.

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Northeast Performer | April, 2000

The three-note passage in “Brinquito” was not an anomaly on “Bohemia” – she is an exceptional rhythmic inventor. The varied worlds she conjures up – some jagged, others even more broken and interrupted – are at the heart of her improvisations. And she is good at it, putting the notes in the right places.

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Northeast Performer | March, 2000

Brenda Hopkins Miranda blends her Puerto Rican roots with Westernized influence on “Bohemia”, her latest release. The combination of Miranda’s “montuno-esque” improvisations with percussionist Bob Moses’ organic approach make for a fresh, revolutionary album. She shows great maturity as a composer on this recording. The elasticity of the meter, the ability to give each section its appropriate time to develop, and the management of her band through the various feels demonstrate a truly successful bandleader and composer.

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Boston Globe | March 9, 2000

Brenda Hopkins Miranda’s thoughts on Rafael Hernandez’s “Preciosa” demonstrated precise dynamic control” […]

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Cadence Magazine | September, 1999

Hopkins Miranda supplements her rapid-fire keystrokes with forays into the innards of her piano, tugging at the strings with rigorous precision. (There the Eye Goes Not)

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El Nuevo Día | July 27, 1999

Brenda Hopkins, the youngest in the trio, is a pianist and composer with an impressive background. Her talent and praised performances were able to impress influential people in the music world, marking the beginning of her tours through Latin America and the United States with stars like Ricardo Montaner, Glenn Monroig, Ednita Nazario, Pandora and Lucecita Benítez. Her fluency and delivery when performing have been appreciated.

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Primera Hora | April 20, 1999

The CD Boricua on Board is at the height of other great Latin jazz pianists.

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